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korero

Inspirational Sayings
Posted:Oct 3, 2018 4:54 pm
Last Updated:Mar 18, 2019 4:41 pm
7462 Views

One of my pet hates is inspirational sayings. One of my mind games is turning them around or altering them. I think they make just as much or even more sense after.

Poverty can't buy happiness either.

Women are OK but you can't beat the real thing.

From mighty oak trees little acorns grow.

The carrot is mightier than the stick.

The best way to get over one man is to get under another one.

The only thing better than an understanding woman is an underlying one.

He who is lost ….. hesitates.

A hard man is good to find.

If you think you are a wit - you are half right

I just hate intolerant people - they really piss me off.

Nostalgia is just not the same as it used to be.

Deny everything - it makes it easier to change your story if you need to.

I'm not a gynecologist but I don't mind taking a look.

The earth will inherit the meek.

The mind is like a parachute – except in the direst emergency it's better to keep it firmly closed and sit on it.

Time is on nobody's side.

If nobody was there to see, how do you know that tree in the forest fell?

Cowardice is the better part of discretion.
4 Comments
The Difference
Posted:Mar 24, 2019 7:39 pm
Last Updated:Mar 25, 2019 2:17 am
56 Views

Hopefully most men and, I expect, all women will know the damage that r ape can do. The destruction of trust and confidence, the feelings of uncleanness and self loathing. Even if we have not experienced it ourselves, enough has been said and written about it that we really have no excuse to not know about it.

And yet, the same basic actions of touching and penetration and orgasm, if undertaken in a consensual and loving context, can engender some of the most wonderful feelings anyone can experience. I all depends on intention and willingness. Consensual sex is not always gentle and sedate. I have read that children who stumble across it often think some kind of attack is being perpetrated, but so long as both partners are responding in kind it's a positive and life affirming activity.

Well, so it is with bdsm. Spanking and bondage and verbal humiliation and all manner of other activity could be horribly destructive if undertaken out of spite on an unreceptive partner. I say unreceptive rather than unwilling because it's not enough that a partner tolerates what you are doing. Not if you want more than to selfishly get your rocks off. Not if you care even slightly for their wellbeing. They must actively desire the attention they are getting.

And if they do desire it, if they welcome that spanking or humiliation and they are aroused by it, then it becomes transformed from abuse into a thing of rare beauty. It can unlock feelings and reactions that can not be accessed in any other way, intensities that vanilla sex can never match. What might appear to an uninitiated bystander to be violent or degrading can actually be liberating and fulfilling. And also, damn it's fun!
5 Comments
Racing
Posted:Mar 22, 2019 12:56 pm
Last Updated:Mar 22, 2019 3:49 pm
157 Views
Nurse is off on another adventure race right now, with our daughters. It's being held locally this . 1700 women hiking, biking and paddling round the beaches, headlands, rivers and hills surrounding town. She's doing the medium course, expected time of 8- 10 hours, so she will be in daylight the whole time. Driving out to the start this morning there were headlamps all along the ridges from the long course competitors who started earlier in the dark and some of whom will finish in the dark tonight. Ever so slightly mad.

least it's a perfect day for it, just the sea is a bit rough so the kayak leg to the island is cancelled. I will go down by and by to see them when they cross the town bridge. Nurse says it's her last race but I doubt it. She's just a bit down because she hasn't been able to train due to an injury. Next breath she's talking about competing as a super veteran after she turns 60 next .

2 Comments
Good Advice
Posted:Mar 21, 2019 4:34 pm
Last Updated:Mar 22, 2019 7:51 pm
219 Views
6 Comments
This One's for Brandy
Posted:Mar 21, 2019 11:42 am
Last Updated:Mar 24, 2019 7:40 pm
338 Views

I have started a couple of times write a post on gun control but it's such a complex issue I just get bogged down. Better suited my doctoral thesis I think. ( as if..) So I decided to examine just one tiny bit of it, the statement by Brandy in my blog comments “If someone in that mosque had a gun to fight back perhaps only 9 people would have been murdered instead of 49”.

All right, that sounds like common sense. Shoot the shooter. Problem solved, or at least reduced, stopped in it's tracks, but lets look behind the obvious. Who is going to be armed at the mosque? A security guard? Who is going to for an armed security guard every mosque, church, school and public gathering in NZ, when there had never ever been any kind of attack before? Or should we have just guarded those two mosques on that particular day?

What is the guard going be armed with? A handgun? When the shooter had high powered rifles? Bit of an uneven contest, that one! Should he be uniformed, so if the police show up they will know who is who? Because at the Riverchase Galleria mall shooting the police shot the wrong guy and let the perpetrator get away in the confusion. So, the guard's in uniform, the gunman knows to expect an armed guard (unless we keep them secret?) Who do you think he is going to shoot first? Take your time. You can have three guesses if you need them. Also, do you think the guard's going to be amped up, on high alert because the last attack was just – well – never?

Or should the congregation be armed? With assault rifles? I'm sure every right wing gun advocate would be reassured that the Muslims are toting assault rifles to their mosque meeting to protect themselves! The same people who believe “Islam preaches hate thy neighbor while other religions preach love”. With handguns then? Apart from the issue of imbalance of firepower, that actually might work. In this instance. Because they all know each other and the gunman would be a visible target and if enough of them had guns someone would get in a lucky shot and stop the horror. So for this one we need to look a little deeper. NZ has virtually no handguns. They are illegal except in special circumstances and very hard to obtain. So we would need to change the law to allow more people to have them. Like in the US

What would the cost of such a change be? The US has around 18 times the NZ rate of gun related homicides (this was before the Christchurch shootings – they will have skewed the stats somewhat but updated figures are not yet available. I estimate it will add approx 60% to NZ's gun murder tally for the year). The majority of US gun violence involves handguns (65, so it is hardly responsible to advocate a shift to the US position on handguns. It may have saved lives in the specific instance of the Christchurch mosque shootings but the overall cost of such a change is prohibitive. If 80 people are murdered by firearm in NZ in an average year, and 130 this year, compared to 720 every year if we achieved the US rate of shootings then it would be madness to say we should adopt the US model.

The problem with statements such as that arming members of the public would have reduced the death toll in the Christchurch shootings is that it sounds reasonable. It provides some prospect of preventing such shootings in the future, even if that prospect is actually false or very very tenuous. The other problem is that it shuts up the lefties, because we go off to think the whole issue over. Which is quite an undertaking for someone with a low wattage brain like mine. And before you start in saying I'm setting the left up as holier than thou, there are plenty on the left who do the same thing, spout slogans rather than workable solutions, like those who want to ban guns altogether. There are plenty of extremists on both sides.

Now I'm sorry if I've taken the piss a bit Brandy, and I'm not intending to pick on you in particular but if you make statements like those quoted above you must expect to have them debated. Peace be upon you.
17 Comments
Still Don't Get It
Posted:Mar 20, 2019 7:10 pm
Last Updated:Mar 21, 2019 8:11 pm
311 Views
Some people still don't get it. I thought I was pretty slow on the uptake but oh my gosh! It's one Australian senator in particular we have some issues with. If there's one thing we should have learned from the tragedy, it's to not lump people in together.



Australians, please accept my apologies for my more retarded countrymen.
9 Comments
Words
Posted:Mar 20, 2019 5:04 pm
Last Updated:Mar 21, 2019 6:25 pm
277 Views
3 Comments
A hero!
Posted:Mar 20, 2019 4:53 pm
Last Updated:Mar 21, 2019 2:56 pm
302 Views

Excerpt from NZ herald news article 21/03/2019:

Linwood Mosque shooting hero Abdul Aziz who confronted the gunman and is being commended for saving lives met the delegation and told them how the drama unfolded.

Linwood Mosque Imam Alabi Lateef Zirullah heard a voice outside the mosque at about 1.55pm and saw a man wearing dark military-style clothing and holding a large semi-automatic weapon.

He then saw two bodies lying on the ground.

"When I saw those Muslims shot dead I just told our brothers, 'Go down! Go down! Somebody has just shot our brothers outside the masjid'," Zirullah said.

Kabul-born Aziz ran outside screaming and as the gunman ran back to his car to reportedly swap weapons, Aziz hurled an Eftpos machine at him.

"He got another gun from his car and he started shooting at me," Aziz told the delegation, adding that he ducked behind parked cars, before picking up a gun the shooter had abandoned. He pointed it and squeezed the trigger but it was out of ammunition.

When the gunman tried to free, Aziz hurled the gun at the windscreen "like an arrow" and it shattered the windscreen before he raced off.

The gunman was caught by two quick-thinking policemen soon after on Brougham St.
5 Comments
Tree Planting
Posted:Mar 20, 2019 1:46 am
Last Updated:Mar 20, 2019 1:07 pm
282 Views

The hot weather has well and truly gone now, the ground is nice and damp and there's no more prospect of it getting seriously dry this season, so it's tree planting time. I delivered some to an ex neighbour who had been asking for them months ago. He seemed amazed I had remembered and was all grateful, to which my response was "Hey, way I'm looking at it you are providing the land for my trees to grow on." He laughed but I was serious.

There are two meanings of the word "mine". One is ownership and the other associative. My cows belong to me. My kids are associated with me. I see my trees as being in the second category. I provide some care and attention when they're small and can't fend for themselves and once I plant them out they are their own selves. These are the native trees I'm speaking of. I also grow timber trees which are owned because one day my grandkids or their grandkids might cut them down and use them. I hope the native trees will never be cut down but since some may live for a thousand years or even two thousand, that's going to be up to future generations. I can only do my bit and hope for the best.
1 comment

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